Morning Roundtables

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Wednesday and Thursday mornings began with coffee, breakfast, and a discussion about emerging topics in laboratory sustainability. The Labs21 2009 Annual Conference agenda once again featured Morning Roundtables to provide an opportunity for discussion on the ideas and challenges faced by some of today's high-performance facilities.

The following Morning Roundtables occurred:

Wednesday, September 23

Thursday, September 24


 

Wednesday, September 23
8 – 9 a.m.

Energy Conservation, Behavior Change, and New Technologies Support Safety in Research Laboratories

Led by:

  • Lynda Boomer, Michigan State University

  • Dave Erickson, Michigan State University

This session explored how a research university can partner with stakeholders on campus to reduce its carbon footprint, create a culture of sustainability and maintain a high level of safety in laboratory environments. The Morning Roundtable discussion introduced the Be Spartan Green campaign at Michigan State University and new control technologies implemented as a pilot project in two of their facilities on campus to reduce exhaust fan power and increase safety, while engaging the faculty, students, and staff in sustainability efforts to create the culture of conservation.

 

The Learning Laboratory—Increasing Sustainability Awareness Among Science and Technology Students

Led by:

  • Amorette Getty, University of California-Santa Barbara
  • Peter James, UK Higher Education Environmental Performance Improvement (HEEPI) Project

This session was aimed at laboratory teachers and researchers. It examined current laboratory practices and learning opportunities regarding sustainability issues in the curriculum, as well as experiential learning. Examples of learning opportunities include measuring laboratory equipment energy and chemical procedures within the curriculum to think through issues of life cycle impact, ecotoxicity, and waste; optimizing time and saving resources under the pressures of discovery and lack of time and funding; and HVAC system troubleshooting, LEED certification and continuous commissioning as the basis of engineering case studies.

 

Safely Achievable Reductions in Exhaust Fan Energy on Laboratory Buildings

Led by:

  • Chet Wisner, Ambient Air Technologies
  • Fred Bockmiller, University of California-Irvine

Laboratory buildings typically use the majority of electric power on research and university campuses, primarily to run the HVAC systems. This Morning Roundtable session briefly introduced the results of a study sponsored by the University of California-Irvine to determine how much electric energy used to run laboratory exhaust fans can typically be saved through relatively minor modifications while continuing to ensure safe operations. The goal of this session was to discuss how these energy-saving techniques can be implemented on other university and research campuses.

 

Thursday, September 24
8 – 9 a.m.

Interactive Design Challenge—The Climate Positive Research Campus

Led by:

  • Randy Lacey, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

This one hour session invited participants to join in forming a working group to consider ideas and strategies that push the envelope for research campuses attempting to become climate-neutral. The working group began exploring design ideas for individual laboratory modules and, during the coming year, will meet via scheduled conference calls to consider climate-neutral solutions for laboratory system, whole building, and whole campus levels. Participants were encouraged to share design ideas that have been used successfully as well as those that have not been tested but have potential.  Ideas were not constrained by cost or technical feasibility. The NREL Science and Technology facility (LEED Platinum laboratory) served as a starting point for design ideas. Ideas collected during this session will be assembled in an article to create a vision for a climate-positive laboratory campus.

 

Building Operations and Maintenance for Sustainability— A Multi-Stakeholder Responsibility


Led By:

  • Peter Crabtree, Laney College

Contributors:

  • Chuck Frost, Laney College
  • Jeff Seewald, Building Intelligence Group

In this Morning Roundtable discussion, participants continued the dialogue from Wednesday's session “O&M for High Performance Laboratories: Changing the Paradigm of Competence and Culture” to explore how the full spectrum of building stakeholders (including architects, engineers, owners, managers, building operators, and occupants) best supports the often undervalued task of building optimization, operations and maintenance (O,O&M) in high tech facilities.

Policymakers are beginning to recognize that today's building operators and maintenance personnel need to become proactive agents of building optimization in order to achieve local, regional, and national sustainability goals. However, building operations staff cannot do so without all building stakeholders taking responsibility and supporting the design and day-to-day implementation for effective O,O&M strategies.

In this roundtable discussion, leaders shared first-hand stories about challenges and successes of effective building operations and encourage participants to bring their stories. Group leaders then identified key needs and possible next steps for the Labs21 Community to facilitate an organizational shift toward fully valuing and supporting O,O&M as a true sustainability strategy.

 

Sustainable Design in K-14 Learning Laboratories


Led by:

  • Jim Jones, Virginia Tech

The Center for High Performance Learning Environments at Virginia Tech—a Labs21 Center of Excellence-in cooperation with the American Institute of Architects (AIA), is developing a half-day workshop that addresses recent and emerging issues associated with energy-efficient and sustainable design, and links them with learning laboratories in schools that cater to kindergarten through community college students, or K-14 learning laboratories. The workshop is intended to be a first-of-its-kind offering for the concept of “buildings that teach.”

“Buildings that teach” is a philosophy whereby the design team uses the architecture of the facility to engage users in learning, both directly and indirectly. Through the presentation of issues associated with energy use, learning and teaching styles, and building monitoring and data processing, design strategies that link these three domains will be discussed. In addition to the presentation of the fundamental overlapping opportunities for these three domains, case studies of projects that demonstrate the concept of “buildings that teach,” was presented for feedback from attendees.

Participants discussed the issues and opportunities for architecture that play a broader role in learning and promotion of the concept of “buildings that teach,” particularly as it relates to energy conservation and renewable technologies.


Agenda Home | Pre-Conference Events | Day 1 | Day 2 | Day 3 |
Posters | Open Discussions | Morning Roundtable Sessions|
Printable Conference Overview (29 KB, 1 pp)