The Value of High Performance Energy Recovery System Analysis During the Initial Stages of Design-Development: University of Delaware Star Comet Lab Building Design

Heidi Dugan, Konvekta USA, Inc.
Rick McGinley, Dynamic Air Corporation

The value of High Performance Energy Recovery System Analysis During the Initial Stages of Design-development: University of Delaware Star Comet Lab Building Design

Balancing the higher initial capital requirements of high performance energy recovery systems with the long term benefits of greater annual utility savings is always a challenge. If a comprehensive analysis is done during the initial design stages of a project, energy efficiency can be maximized while at the same time, minimizing first cost.

Benefits to consider include:

  • Reduced peak heating and cooling requirements
  • Potential for additional Utility rebate dollars
  • N+1 redundancy with less total boiler and chiller capacity
  • Potential for reduced central heating and cooling plant footprint
  • Potential of additional LEED credit
  • Reduced Fan Energy requirements due to One Coil Design and the elimination of conventional heating and cooling coils
  • Maximize heat recovery system annual hours of effective operation using Indirect Evaporative Cooling and Dehumidification strategies

The University of Delaware Star Comet Lab Building design upholds the institution's long and distinguished history of research in the areas of energy and the environment. Energy efficiency was a primary consideration in the design and selection of mechanical systems.

As a result of energy recovery system analysis the sustainable and energy efficiency highlights include:

  • 91% of the annual heating energy requirement provided by the energy recovery system
  • 40% of the annual cooling energy requirement provided by the energy recovery system
  • Over $1 million of costs savings in achieving N+1 heating plant redundancy
  • Reduced heating plant footprint- improved space management
  • Improved heating plant COP due to lower hot water supply temperature requirements and greater temperature differentials associated with energy recovery system

Learning Objectives

  • How can the selection of a high performance energy recovery system result in a lower initial capital costs as compared to a conventional heat recovery system
  • Why is it important to consider energy recovery options early in the design-development process
  • How to increase the total annual hours of effective operation of a heat recovery system when dehumidification is required
  • How a high performance energy recovery systems can help to achieve N+1 redundancy with significantly less heating plant boiler capacity

Biographies:

Heidi Dugan is a Senior VP with Konvekta USA. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Engineering from the Rochester Institute of Technology and has also studied at Harvard Business School and the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University. She has worked in the environmental technology field for more than 25 years with an emphasis in green technologies. When not working, she can be found hiking or relaxing in Rocky Mountains of Colorado.

Rick co-founded DAC Sales in 1991, and has over 30 years of HVAC engineering and sales experience.Rick specializes in air-to-air energy recovery, custom air handling, variable air volume systems, humidification systems and critical environment ventilation equipment. Before starting DAC Sales, Rick worked his way from manager of John Oldach Associates in Portland to the president of Oldach Northeast. He was the president of an energy audit and service company and the Solar Program manager of the Maine Office of Energy Resources.

 

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