Enhanced Fume Hood Design Features and Equipment for Sustainable Laboratories

Gary Roepke, Labconco Corporation

"Enhanced Fume Hood Design Features and Equipment for Sustainable Laboratories" will provide top takeaways that the engineer, architect, lab planner, health and safety officer, and building owner should consider when designing a new lab or retrofitting an existing lab with fume hoods and other exhausted equipment.

Firstly, for new laboratory design, the airflow basics will be explored with a typical airflow example that reiterates the definition of a high performance fume hood. The airflow basics of fume hoods will be explored and how it relates to the numbers of airflow and sustainability in the laboratory.

Secondly, for both new and retrofit laboratories, exploration of ways to reduce airflow (CFM) will be discussed with regard to the specification. Ideas on ways to alter the specification to make the laboratory more sustainable will be discussed and give common sense and unique solutions. The importance of both initial capital costs and ongoing operating costs will be discussed to give laboratory designers important takeaways when designing their next laboratory or retrofitting an existing lab.

Thirdly, fume hood exhaust is important but so is the other equipment in the lab that is exhausted as well as the blowers that exhaust that equipment. A brief review of Variable Airflow Volume (VAV) will occur for new designs along with new types of energy efficient sustainable blowers that can provide unique solutions for both new and retrofit labs. Other equipment examples entail biological safety cabinets and enclosures that are exhausted along with the fume hoods. The combination of all the exhaust from the lab will be considered and leave the attendee takeaways when designing their next new lab or retrofitting an existing lab. The fundamental rules of airflow (CFM), static pressure, and horsepower will be reviewed giving the lab designer a tool to use when designing a sustainable lab or retrofitting an existing lab to make it sustainable. New improved technology from filtered hoods and filtered enclosures will be discussed for controlled applications and how they help with sustainability.

In summary, airflow basics of the equipment for the new lab will be explored. Ways to reduce the airflow (CFM) and make the new lab or retrofit lab more sustainable will be explored and provide insight into both initial capital costs and ongoing operating costs. While fume hoods are important, other exhausted equipment such as biological safety cabinets and enclosures are important to sustainability and the reduction of building exhaust. New and retrofit lab design will be explored with regard to the use of newer technology available today.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the airflow basics and airflow (CFM) of equipment specified for the lab and use that knowledge to design a new lab or retrofit an existing lab. Not all equipment is alike and the knowledge of the specifications are vitally important to sustainability in the lab.
  • Identification of ways to reduce airflow in the laboratory will be explored and provide a sustainable lab (new or retrofit). Specifications for the fume hood are important and how it relates to airflow (CFM). The importance of initial capital costs and ongoing operating costs will be explored with examples for the lab designer to use and calculate.
  • Evaluation of the fume hood exhaust is important, but so is the exhaust from other equipment in the lab such as biological safety cabinets and other enclosures. The lab designer will be presented with information to consider when designing a lab (new or retrofit). The calculation of airflow, static pressure, and horsepower helps the lab planner.
  • Lab design will be presented with ways to explore newer technology for fume hood design, biological safety cabinets, new energy efficient blowers, and filtered hoods and enclosures that help to sustain the lab. The new information should be considered by the lab designer, building owner, and health and safety professional in the laboratory design.

Biography:

Gary Roepke is a licensed professional engineer and has been employed by Labconco Corporation for 27 years with an emphasis managing design teams in fume hoods, enclosures, and glove boxes since 1995. Gary received his mechanical engineering degree from the University of Illinois with a recent graduate certificate in Strategic Technology and Innovation and enjoys spending his free time with family sports, golf, and traveling with his wife and two girls.

 

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